Applying the Book of Kings

I need your help.

Help figuring out how to apply the book of Kings.

I’ve been working hard this summer on a commentary on 1, 2 Kings for the Story of God series for Zondervan.  After writing all day, I haven’t really felt like writing a blog at the end of the day, so I’ve only made a few posts this summer.  But this post may help me write the rest of the book.

This project is a big one–200,000 words on the book of Kings–which will by far the longest book I’ve written.  A couple of years ago I had three book contracts, but had made very little progress on any of them so I was losing a lot of sleep.  “How am I going to finish?”

But after having completed two of them (Prostitutes and Polygamists / The Historical Writings), the end is in sight.  I’m supposed to finish this commentary by next summer (I already asked for a 1 year extension).

I’ve finished the Solomon narrative (1 Kings 1-11), and have finally moved into the section on the divided monarchy.

At the end of each chapter, I need to reflect on how to apply these stories to our contemporary contexts.  This is where you come in.  If you read or teach the Bible, particularly the book of Kings (I refer to it as one book, since the division into two parts came later), I’d love to hear some of the ways you apply it.

What do you do with the prophetic stories of Elijah or Elisha?
What can we learn from Ahab, Jezebel, Athaliah, or Manasseh?
How do you apply the wild story of Micaiah in 1 Kings 22?
What do we do with the massive bloodshed caused by righteous Jehu (2 Kings 9-10)?
How can we reform our ministries and churches like Hezekiah or Josiah?

Share your thoughts on this blog, on Facebook, or email me directly at dlamb@biblical.edu.

Thanks.

 

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2 comments

  1. For 1 King 3:16-28, maybe the application could be that we need to second guess our snap-judgments. If we submit our judgment to God’s wisdom, perhaps he can help us to discern when the truth is actually counterintuitive. (I take it that the other woman, who is often seen as innocent, is actually guilty! Based on a close reading of the text…)

    1. Thanks, Jeremy, for engaging. Just to clarify, “the other woman” is the one who said “Let her have the child”? And why do you think she’s guilty? I just want to make sure I understand.

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